Practical Growth: A Self-Recovery Podcast

The Phantom Reality of Narcissistic Relationships

April 04, 2024 Season 4 Episode 406
The Phantom Reality of Narcissistic Relationships
Practical Growth: A Self-Recovery Podcast
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Practical Growth: A Self-Recovery Podcast
The Phantom Reality of Narcissistic Relationships
Apr 04, 2024 Season 4 Episode 406

In this eye-opening episode of Practical Growth, we're peeling back the curtain on the enigmatic world of narcissistic relationships.

Have you ever found yourself ensnared in the web of a partner’s universe, or do you struggle to understand why friends can't easily leave these destructive ties? You're not alone, and this conversation is for you.

"What is a narcissistic relationship?" We'll kick off our discussion with a clear breakdown of this complex dynamic, shedding light on the psychological mechanisms at play. Does your relationship leave you feeling consistently unheard and invisible? We're here to discuss the often-overlooked signs that might suggest you're more than just star-crossed lovers; you might be caught in a narcissist’s captivating narrative.

"Why are they so hard to leave?" We’ll explore the seductive dance of the narcissistic relationship – why it's so easy to fall into and why detaching can feel like an impossible task. Through powerful anecdotes and psychological insights, we'll reveal the magnetic pull of these toxic bonds.

"Breaking free and moving forward." Most importantly, we'll chart the course towards liberation and self-discovery. How does one break the cycle? What does the path to recovery look like? It's not about a quick fix—it's a profound, personal revolution. I will guide you through creating healthier relationship habits, building the resilience to recognize and resist narcissistic lures, and cultivating an environment that fosters genuine connections.

Empathy and encouragement are what you can expect here—because I believe in your ability to grow past adversity. Together, we’re on a mission to empower and validate your feelings because your story deserves to be heard—and you deserve a narrative where you're the hero.

Join me as I step into the labyrinth with a torch of wisdom to recognize, understand, and overcome the phantom reality of narcissistic relationships. Tune in to find solace, support, and the first steps toward a healthier, happier you.

Support the Show.

Love the podcast? Leave a 5* review on Apple Podcasts. Ready to commit to the next level of transformation? Join my email list to get my best advice. Want to get coached by me? Apply now: www.therealebjohnson.com.

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this eye-opening episode of Practical Growth, we're peeling back the curtain on the enigmatic world of narcissistic relationships.

Have you ever found yourself ensnared in the web of a partner’s universe, or do you struggle to understand why friends can't easily leave these destructive ties? You're not alone, and this conversation is for you.

"What is a narcissistic relationship?" We'll kick off our discussion with a clear breakdown of this complex dynamic, shedding light on the psychological mechanisms at play. Does your relationship leave you feeling consistently unheard and invisible? We're here to discuss the often-overlooked signs that might suggest you're more than just star-crossed lovers; you might be caught in a narcissist’s captivating narrative.

"Why are they so hard to leave?" We’ll explore the seductive dance of the narcissistic relationship – why it's so easy to fall into and why detaching can feel like an impossible task. Through powerful anecdotes and psychological insights, we'll reveal the magnetic pull of these toxic bonds.

"Breaking free and moving forward." Most importantly, we'll chart the course towards liberation and self-discovery. How does one break the cycle? What does the path to recovery look like? It's not about a quick fix—it's a profound, personal revolution. I will guide you through creating healthier relationship habits, building the resilience to recognize and resist narcissistic lures, and cultivating an environment that fosters genuine connections.

Empathy and encouragement are what you can expect here—because I believe in your ability to grow past adversity. Together, we’re on a mission to empower and validate your feelings because your story deserves to be heard—and you deserve a narrative where you're the hero.

Join me as I step into the labyrinth with a torch of wisdom to recognize, understand, and overcome the phantom reality of narcissistic relationships. Tune in to find solace, support, and the first steps toward a healthier, happier you.

Support the Show.

Love the podcast? Leave a 5* review on Apple Podcasts. Ready to commit to the next level of transformation? Join my email list to get my best advice. Want to get coached by me? Apply now: www.therealebjohnson.com.

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the Practical Growth Podcast with me, ebi Johnson, author, nlpmp and cognitive reappraisal coach. This is the podcast created for people like you people looking for more, more health, more peace, more happiness. Each week, I explore a new topic in pop psychology and help you build a better life and better relationships. Psychology and help you build a better life and better relationships. Join me for special guests, exciting ideas and practical advice that you can use to improve your life from the inside out. Let's get into it. Hello, hello, hello, my lovelies, it is me, eb, your favorite podcast host, your favorite mediumcom blogger and your favorite NLP MP coach from tick tock. And we're back at it today with that juicy goodness that I know you guys love to hear from me. That's right, boys and gals. We're talking about narcissistic relationships today.

Speaker 1:

Narcissistic relationships, but specifically a really unique phenomenon about the narcissistic relationship and this will give you a little bit of a hint. What happens when you tell your friends or even some of your family that you're in a narcissistic relationship or that you think your partner's a narcissist? What is their reaction? Usually, when I ask my clients this question, or when I ask my followers on Twitter and TikTok and Instagram and I ask them about this, I usually get one pretty glaring answer, one answer more than others. And that is shock, right, when you start telling people I was narcissistically abused or I think this person is a narcissist, a lot of people look at you weird. They look at you sideways, and there's a lot of different reasons for that. One of the big ones is that unless you've experienced the insanity, the extremes of the complexities of narcissistic abuse, it's really hard to see it from the outside. Looking in right, it's really, really, really hard to see it. A lot like emotional abuse in general. It's very, very hard to see. So that's what we're going to talk about today. We're going to talk about these narcissistic relationships, what they are, what they look like, but also why is it so hard for people outside of the relationship to see it and to believe it for themselves? Now a little bit of housekeeping just before we dive in.

Speaker 1:

Sp spots are going to be opening up in May for my one-to-one coaching program. This is my signature two-month program and the focus here is all about helping survivors of narcissistic abuse, helping survivors of trauma, helping ambitious, creative individuals build that ideal, peaceful, contented life right. And there's a few ways that I do this. It's a three-phase program. The first phase is all about focusing on neuroplasticity getting your nervous system to the physically healthiest state possible. Then it's all about somatics. We have to activate your somatic nervous system, get it working in conjunction with your autonomic nervous system so we can get you out of fight or flight and get you into healthier responses and behaviors. Last but not least, it's a big heaping dose of cognitive reprogramming, or cognitive reappraisal. This is where the NLP my qualifications kick in and this is where we really change your behaviors and fast track the transformations that you're seeking in terms of emotional regulation, your relationships and your career.

Speaker 1:

So if you're serious about getting your life online, about feeling a sense of peace from the inside out, being able to control your triggers, being able to control your emotions, being able to control your emotions, being able to stake a claim in your own relationships, then this could be the program for you. Now I only work with a limited number of people. Okay, there's only going to be a few spots opening up in May, so if you're interested in applying for one of those spots, you need to head over to the real EBJohnsoncom and click on working with me and follow the application links all the way through. I will say, though, this is not a program for everyone. If you have not done any therapy, if you have only just started on this journey, if you are someone who's still kind of unclear on what happened or your ultimate goals in terms of your future, your life, your relationships, your career, this may not be the program for you. So it's only for those who are really, really serious about getting their physical, mental and emotional health all in alignment and attunement. So again, if you want to be a part of that, head over to therealebjohnsoncom and click on working with me. All right, here we go, chapter one.

Speaker 1:

Now, I always think it's smart. You know we're going to be looking at this kind of the phantom element of these narcissistic relationships and why it's so hard for people to see and believe us. But I always feel like, before we get into that, I really need to be clear about what I'm talking about when I say narcissism, when I say narcissist, when I say narcissistic relationship. This word has been twisted and tangled and pointed every which way and direction for, like, really superficial and trivial things, and it really shouldn't have been right. So it's been watered down and I want to be very clear that that's not what I'm talking about.

Speaker 1:

Ever, whether it's here on the podcast, whether it's in my medium blogs, whether it's in my medium blogs, whether it's in my TikTok videos, I don't use the term narcissism or narcissistic abuse or any of those other terms lightly. For those of you who know my backstory, you know why I don't use those terms lightly. So I think, up front, we should just be really clear what am I saying when I say someone is a narcissist? When I say someone is a narcissist, I'm talking about someone who shows very specific egocentric traits, who, if sought a diagnosis clinically, could potentially qualify within the diagnostic traits as acknowledged by the DSM-5 for narcissism. Okay, people that could qualify for narcissistic personality disorder. Now, what are those qualifications?

Speaker 1:

Well, there's here's where the misconceptions kick in, because the internet has kind of created this idea that a narcissist is anyone who's selfish, anyone who hurts others, anyone who doesn't do what you like or anyone who lies, and that's simply not true. Now, a narcissist can do all of those things and often do all of those things, but that is not what a narcissist makes the real, true difference between just a selfish, crappy, immature, emotionally you know, unattuned, unintelligent person and a narcissist, unintelligent person and a narcissist. The biggest one is a lack of empathy. There is a clinical lack of empathy and that lack of empathy does a lot of things. Okay, that lack of empathy is what enables a narcissist grandiosity. Because, yes, narcissists can be grandiose. They, they all, have a grandiose perception of self. This, this perception of self that they are better than everyone else, that is the grandiosity.

Speaker 1:

So take, for instance, my mother, who was a covert narcissist. Right, she was someone who used victimhood. She looked very weak, she looked very sad. It was always people wanted to protect her and to provide for her when she should have been providing for herself. But she was able to do that, to use that manipulation against people who you know. There were some people who couldn't pay their own bills and they would come to her and give her money because they felt bad for her. This happened because my mother was able to say well, I've been hurt more than anyone else, so therefore I deserve to be given more than anyone else. Right, that's the grandiosity. And again, that can only occur.

Speaker 1:

That kind of thinking that I am better than others or I am entitled to more than others, that can only come from a lack of empathy, because someone with true empathy would never want to be above people that way, would never want to take from people that way right, would never even want to be a part of a hierarchy where they have to say, well, I'm better than you. Because empathetic people, truly empathetic people, know that doesn't feel good. They don't want to feel that themselves, so they don't want someone else to feel it. Okay, that that is what empathy does and doesn't do, and it is the backbone of what is wrong with the narcissist and it's clinically one of the really big triggers, one of the really big red flags that someone you're dealing with is a narcissist. There is a lack of empathy.

Speaker 1:

Again, my mother remains such a good example and when I speak to my clients because a lot of them that I work with they may be uncertain right, they're sure about their childhood trauma, emotional abuse, neglect, physical abuse. You know the gamut of abuses. They're certain about that. They may not be certain about their parent and they come to me and they're like oh well, how do I know? Is this like? How do I know she's not just a traumatized person herself that had trauma and some neurodivergence, maybe autism, adhd, and the answer for me is always the same, and I always use my mother as the example is this lack of empathy, this lack of empathy? You know, my mother could hit me with a belt at 11, 12 years old until I vomited on myself because she didn't have empathy. Right, she didn't have empathy. She could certainly be scared of being embarrassed I shouldn't want the neighbors to hear me throwing up on myself or what she was saying and doing to me but she didn't actually feel bad for harming a child to that point. So this is what I'm talking about.

Speaker 1:

Narcissists are able to go through these extremes of abuse because of a lack of empathy. So when I am talking narcissism, when I am talking narcissistic relationships, I am talking these extremes and a lack of empathy that cause all of this backbone of harm, that create these individuals who, if they ever did seek help, could probably be clinically diagnosed, all right. So let's look a little bit deeper Before we look at why it's so hard for people to understand the narcissistic relationship from the outside, looking in to help us, to get in the way to do something. You really have to understand the narcissistic relationship, right, because it's insane. It's insane, it really, truly is, and again not using this word colloquially or lightly insane. It really truly is. And again, not using this word colloquially or lightly the extremes within a narcissistic relationship are literally so hot and cold and they move so fast and they are so unpredictable that when you explain them to someone outside of the relationship, they look at you like you're nuts. They have no idea, they just don't get it. And even for the people in those relationships it's the same. Okay, it's the same. I always like to go back to these. You know we could go through the list right.

Speaker 1:

A narcissistic relationship happens when it starts with idealization and it starts with bonding really quickly. And it starts with mirroring, with the narcissist showing you very quickly what you want to see and forming this really fast bond and dependency and then isolation. It starts with mirroring, with the narcissist showing you very quickly what you want to see and forming this really fast bond and dependency and then isolation. And then they degrade you and then they discard you. Right, we know those things, but I do think it's always helpful for you to see how those extremes actually work within a relationship. And again, my family remains this example. It remains this example.

Speaker 1:

I'm not going to use any names. I'm not going to use any direct relationships. Those who know me personally they'll know this story well, because I was telling everybody who would listen in high school and no one was helping me. But there was a couple in my immediate family, a husband and wife, and he, without a doubt, narcissist, huge narcissist, top to bottom textbook, grandiose narcissist down to being a police officer. I mean absolutely nuts, right. And then there was his wife, who's another kettle of fish on her own, but watching their relationship, unbelievable extremes, unbelievable manipulation and mind games and coercion and fear and terrorizing. Tell my friends they wouldn't believe me. Because there's one story.

Speaker 1:

I came home one day and my mom was like, get in the car, we have to go now, we have to go to their house now. And so my mom takes me to this family member's house and he is outside with a baseball bat beating his wife's car, like shattering the windows, breaking the mirrors, denting the hood, denting the doors, just absolutely rips the. He took the hood up at one point. It was like hitting the engine, just absolutely destroying the car. And it was because his wife was working now, his wife was making more money than him, his wife was being able to save more money. His wife technically had a job that was kind of more prestigious because it was a government job and she was reliant on this car to do this job and so by destroying this car, he was taking that away from her. They also lived on a main road in a very small town and this was a very well-known house that they lived in.

Speaker 1:

So you know, it's three, four o'clock in the afternoon, everybody's getting done with baseball practice and they're getting out of school and everyone's coming home from work and everyone's driving by watching this. So there's the degree of humiliation as well, and you would see that just that alone. When I would tell my friends about this episode, they'd be like what, that can't be real. Because when they would talk to this family member because my friends knew this family member, many of them met this family member so nice, so soft member, so nice, so soft, spoken, so intelligent, so like kind of cultured and worldly and just such this like stand up, citizen and churchgoer and all of those things, all of those things, and even inside the relationship with his wife, you know, you know one day he'd wake up and he'd be like let's go on a cruise. I love you so much, you've put up with so much. Thank you so much for what you do. And then, two months later, this family member would come home and throw divorce papers on the table in front of the children and say tell your mother, I'm done with her, done with her.

Speaker 1:

So these are the kinds of extremes in the relationship, in a narcissistic relationship, that we're talking about. And it is precisely these symptoms of a narcissistic relationship, which is, you know, isolation, tear, degradation, all of those things present in my family stories, degradation all of those things present in my family stories. I could give you examples of any of them. You know, the mirroring and idealization with this family member that I was just giving you the example of happened very fast. Every woman this family member had ever been with thought this person was a knight in shining armor and then he would isolate them, essentially, get them away from their family, get them away from their friends, get him and get them entirely enveloped in his world where no one could get to them, where they had no options, no escape, no village to get them out and then break them down. You're fat, you're lazy, you don't work, I do everything, you do nothing. You know that kind of breakdown.

Speaker 1:

This is what a narcissistic relationship is. It is these horrendous extremes, all at the whim of one person's. It's not even just their ego right, it is because they don't have empathy. And narcissists, no matter how grandiose they are, are the most inherently insecure people in the world. That's why they develop this front of being the you know pardon my french pieces of shit that they are, because inside they fundamentally know that they are being pieces of shit and that they are broken and that they are not doing the work to be better people. So they create these horrendous visages and project all of their anger, all their upset, disappointments that they have for themselves at other people. And that's why you can't ever find peace in a narcissistic relationship. No matter how many eggshells you walk on, no matter what changes you make, there's no peace in it ever. There's no rest in it ever. You are constantly on edge.

Speaker 1:

Even in my family, because this couple was often on the scene within my family you would hear that male family member's keys in the driveway and the children would literally run and hide. Everyone would be like battle stations. Get to where you can be quiet and out of sight so that he doesn't target you. It was like that scene in Jurassic Park where the T-Rex gets out and they're like don't move, he can't see you if you don't move. And we used to make that joke and laugh about it.

Speaker 1:

This is the 24-7 environment that we're all living in and it's all because that one person is so fundamentally angry at themselves. They hate themselves, they despise themselves. They know what they are, so they make everyone else pay hell for it. Because they don't have empathy. The people around them are just objects. It goes very close to psychopathy. This is why all psychopaths are narcissists. It comes back to that lack of empathy. It's dangerous. When you don't have empathy, you become willing to harm others, and that's what a narcissistic relationship is. It's constant subjugation and harm for self-validation of the narcissist.

Speaker 1:

So chapter three in this saga is the big question I posed at the top of this. Why can't people see that? Why can't outsiders see these crazy abuses, these extremes, that it is abuse, and why don't they get involved? Because you would think that they would see it, especially people in normal relationships, more normal average households. You would think that they would see that even before the people inside and they would get them out right Like someone's asleep in the house and the house catches on fire and the neighbor goes, oh no, and they go and knock on the door and get people out of the house because they didn't realize it was on fire. You would think that's what happens, but it's not. Why? Why doesn't that happen? Well, for one, it's a lot of the same reasons.

Speaker 1:

We get into the narcissistic relationship in the first place. Right, people are just charmed. They're just charmed With that male family member that I was talking about. A lot of people to this day won't believe. You know, if I walked up to people that have known him from 20, 30 years and were to tell them these stories, they would go, oh, that never happened. You're exaggerating, that never happened. He would never snatch a baby out of his wife's arms, never do that. And that's because they've been charmed. Anytime they've had an interaction with him, he's been smiling, nice, pleasant, funny, charming, charismatic, just a light beam of light to talk to, and they've been charmed by that. And a lot of people outside of our narcissistic relationships have that right. Whether they're neighbors, they could be our own family members, they could be your parents and still be charmed by the devil. Okay, I'm not literally calling narcissists the devil, but you know what I'm saying. You know what I'm saying. So that's one of the big reasons they get charmed by it.

Speaker 1:

Second factor is some people don't understand it. Again, it's really hard for you to conceive of this as someone healing once you see how immersed in that abuse you were. But that's not normal. It's not normal. It was your normal, but it's not normal for the population. The majority of people around you are not in relationships that extreme or abusive. We get immersed in them.

Speaker 1:

We watch drama on TV where they show these things as being very common, where these things happen to move plots along, to add extremes to relationships that you want to watch. But that's not actually common. It was not common for teenage girls to go and watch male family members destroy a car in the middle of the afternoon because they're insecure that their wife earns more money than them. That's not normal. I thought it was. I genuinely, genuinely thought, because I was like this is crazy and I would tell people and they'd be like oh wow and just blow it off. I thought, oh well, everyone's family must have someone that takes a baseball bat to a car once or twice a year. That must just be a thing. It's not a thing. It's not a thing Watching someone snatch a baby, a newborn baby, from their wife and then say do something about it, do it, call the police.

Speaker 1:

They'll believe me, not you. That's not normal. Even if you experience it as your normal, it's not the normal overall. And so so many people that don't come from those extremes, they just can't see it because they can't conceive of it. They're not looking for it. It's like a fish in water, it's like us with air. We don't think about it, it's just there, we breathe it and it is. We're not looking for blue air, you know. And so it's the same with people outside of the relationships. They just that's crazy. They've never experienced that, they can't conceive of that. You must have imagined that, because how could something that horrible exist? Nothing that horrible has ever existed in their lives. So that's a big part of it as well. And then, of course, last but not least, we have to think about the obvious, which is, even when people do see it, what do you do? What do you do?

Speaker 1:

I just saw a whole thread, hundreds of people on Twitter the other day who were just like laughing about narcissistic abuse and anyone who says they've been narcissistically abused and how anyone who even uses that word should be discredited because they just are like discontent. Little teenage girls, how dismissive is that? And it was like if you had sat and watched a film of my life and these things that have happened, these extremes of one day oh I love you. This male family member one time, after he got caught having an affair, sent all the women in the family flowers. So he like sent flowers to school for me and he sent them to my mother and he sent them to his wife and he like all the you know and these like really expensive arrangements and stuff. But then a couple months later at Christmas, what do you think happened? Horror show, blow up, threats, I'm going to divorce you, I'm going to put you in a nursing like crazy stuff, crazy stuff and it's.

Speaker 1:

People would not be willing to be that dismissive if they had like watched those things happen, right. But overall people are happy to develop these kinds of dismissive attitudes. And even if they're not dismissive, where do you go? What do you do? So many of these institutions the police are dismissive psychologists. Many of them can be quite dismissive. When you're talking about these extremes and abuse. They tend to look at you and go oh well, you must be borderline personality disorder because you must be exaggerating. What do you do? That is one of the biggest reasons that people don't get in the way. And even when they try to interject and they try to say something, narcissists are charmers. They even charm the people that they're abusing.

Speaker 1:

So many times people could try to get involved. I did have one teacher one time that tried to get involved and all it did was make my mom sneakier. That's all it did. I had one parent, one coach and teacher who challenged her. It's the same person who said you know, basically, like I see you, I know what you're doing, it's's wrong, you should treat your daughter better. And so she just timed how she showed up for me, so it looked like she was getting more involved in my life. But at home it was hell. It was absolute hell. I had to move out because she rained down hell on me because someone found out what was going on and took me seriously, because someone found out what was going on and took me seriously.

Speaker 1:

So there's all these dynamics at play and it's why we have to be really cautious and not point the finger at every enabler or every person we want to call an enabler, because the abuse is so complex, we are still learning about it, we are still coming to terms with it, we're still understanding ourselves and it's going to take time for the rest of the world to catch up and to understand. And so, instead of being angry at the people around us, the people around others who don't get in the way, who don't stop the narcissistic abuse you know, within reason I'm not talking about, like parents who have a duty of care to protect their children, right, but, like you know, the people outside of the family, distant friends or teachers or whatever instead of being mad at them, we should just focus on educating them, on sharing our stories as often as we can and sharing how and why they affected us, because that's going to be the real magic in getting communities involved enough, comfortable enough, educated enough to stop the kind of childhoods that you and I had with these narcissistic parents. Now, you know that I am not one to leave you hanging with just the intense discussion, right? I always have tips, I always have tricks, I always have ideas for you on what you can do to a kind of break the cycle of these narcissistic relationships for yourself, but also help others understand narcissistic abuse in a way in which empowers them to act when they see it. Right, because that's really the key. You can't cure narcissism, but you can, by God, heal from narcissistic abuse and I am living proof of that. I'm living proof of that.

Speaker 1:

I am someone with CPTSD who was basically told a long time ago you're fucked, you should just put yourself on medication and just move away from what you're doing and just you know, get married, have kids and just do life and just just bang on right through it, which is not the truth, right? Because CPTSD comes with brain damage and damage to the rest of my nervous system and a lot of other complicated things involved in that, including chronic illness. Right, there's a lot going on, but we can improve that and we can heal that, and when we do that, we help break cycles. Which is especially important for those of you who are parents is breaking those cycles. For me, so much of it starts with self-care, because you need that self-awareness, you need to know where the broken parts are that you need to fix and you also need to seek out support, because you can't really do this on your own. More than just educational support. You really need good people around you to remind you that there is good in the world, that you are not broken, that the world is not broken. You were just hurt by broken people, and that's really why I do what I do. That's why I focus so hard on somatics right Somatics getting that somatic nervous system active.

Speaker 1:

You know there's this thing called a window of tolerance. If you're a neurodiverse person, if you're someone with ADHD, adhd, autism, it's so crucially important that you increase what's called your window of tolerance, which is basically how your nervous system works together the autonomic side and the somatic side. The better those two systems are able to interchange, switch on and off as needed and exchange those nice feel good hormones and chemicals, the higher your window of tolerance is means more resilient you will be to sensory triggers and stress and all that kind of stuff. So somatics is so, so, so crucially important when you're healing your nervous system, because you need those different parts of the nervous system working together in order to be able to regulate your emotions, to physically feel okay in your physical body. So semantics is key, neuroplasticity is key, getting your brain as physically healthy as possible, making sure your neurons and synapses are working together to the best of the ability that you can heal them and recover them and get them working together. Because, yes, there are things that you can do to physically improve your nervous system. You may not heal every single ding and dong that's been done to it, but you can do a lot to it. And again, cognitive reprogramming is key.

Speaker 1:

When we spend years in narcissistic relationships, we get conditioned by those narcissists and it's, you know, it's a lot like cult programming. We have to reprogram ourselves and figure out what programs it is we want to run. How is it that we want to design our lives? How is it that we want to react to the stress of life? All of that is key for us to break free and to heal. And all of those things are crucial before we can reach out and help others, before we can start inspiring hope in people like us, before we can start telling our stories in a way that touch outsiders, so that they know what to look for, so that they truly understand that experience and empathize with it. All of that kind of has to build on the back of you breaking free and healing. All right.

Speaker 1:

So what did we cover this episode? We covered a lot. We covered some pretty big stuff. We've talked about what real narcissism is that lack of empathy. We have talked about what a narcissistic relationship looks like those crazy of empathy. We have talked about what a narcissistic relationship looks like those crazy extremes and we've talked about the different things that keep people from seeing what's happening, that feed into that phantom element of these narcissistic relationships.

Speaker 1:

Most importantly, I've given you some of my inside tips on making sure that you break these cycles, that you heal, that you recover. And that's really what it comes down to. That's really what I hope you get from this episode, what I hope you get from my stories on Medium, what I hope you get from TikTok. It's that recovery is possible, that we are breaking cycles, that we are changing the minds of people. We're not just using the term narcissism vapidly. Okay, we know what happened to us, we know what we are preventing from happening to our children and to other children in the future. And that's the really important thing that I hope you walk away and take from this. If nothing else, if nothing else and again I'm living proof you can come out of those extremes and you can become a normal human being. Thank you, so so so so much for listening. I really hope you got something out of the episode. I hope you enjoyed it. I hope you feel educated, informed, inspired.

Speaker 1:

If you want to learn more about this, you can always head over to Medium. You can visit me on Instagram. You can follow me on TikTok. I'll be doing a live there this week and next week. So go ahead, come, get involved, come ask me some questions. It's live coaching. It's one of the best ways to just kind of get involved and see what I'm about and see how I work and get advice on your family and your relationships and your healing and success journey.

Speaker 1:

For you, if you do want to get serious about making changes, about fast tracking your healing, making sure that by the end of this year, you are the person you want to be going into 2025. Yeah, you guys were like flying through the sheer Then make sure you head over to therealebjohnsoncom and apply to work with me one-on-one. These are limited spots. My next signature program is going to be opening up, starting back in May, so if you want to grab one of those last spots, head over to therealebjohnsoncom and click on working with me to apply. Everyone else, please don't forget to leave a five-star review of the podcast, if you love it, over on apple podcasts and make sure you're following me on medium and tiktok and beyond, and I'll be back next week with a new episode that, hopefully, is going to thrill and inspire you. So keep your heads up, keep your eyes on the stars and keep moving forward until we speak again. Bye, bye, bye you.

Understanding Narcissistic Relationships
Narcissistic Relationships and Lack of Empathy
Why Outsiders Don't Intervene in Abuse
Breaking the Cycle of Narcissistic Abuse
Fast Track Your Healing